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to the Altris Blog

Making time for leadership

Isn’t it interesting how often we hear people say, “I would love to do that, but I don’t have time”.  Relating this to the leadership world, making the time in spite of many competing priorities differentiates OK leaders from great leaders and from exceptional leaders. I read a quote recently, “Time is the most important… Read more


Five things on our santa list

Its been a tough couple of years in the far south and many employers will be heaving a sigh of relief that they have got to the end of 2011 intact, so here are five things that we think they might like to have neatly gift wrapped in their Christmas stockings.


Don’t just sit there, do something

As a leader of a tempestuous team, you could be forgiven for expecting an independent and expert team coach to ‘sort’ team dynamics by way of a team-based intervention.
Your role as the leader, as well as the clarity with which you handle your team after the intervention, can make a big difference to the sustainability of the intervention.
So as leaders expecting changes from a team-based intervention that you haven’t directly been a part of, here are some tips post-intervention you can use in discussion with your tempestuous team:
1. Get clear on the outcome
2. Get clear on your role
3. Set expectations
4. Get them thinking for themselves
5. Have an agreed Escalation process
Escalation processes are often not part of the picture. Yet they are critical for a team whose members are expected to ‘sort it out’ themselves.
As leaders of a tempestuous team, our role as a leader does make a big difference to the sustainability of the intervention. And we sometimes don’t use it to our full advantage.


Valuing time together

The benefit of spending time ‘being’ with each other as opposed to ‘doing’ things together. How this can forge deeper and more meaningful relationships.


Is your self image blinding?

In this weeks blog I’m going to ask you a question and have you reflect a little.
How often does the word ‘should’ feature for you? When you look at the world around you, do you have a strong sense of how it should be? Do you see what should be done in your workplace and what shouldn’t? Do you have a clear view on how people should behave or act or what they should do?
Or what about yourself? Do you have a strong view on how you should be? How you should act or behave? Do you have a strong picture of what is right for you? How you should and shouldn’t be perceived? How you should look or shouldn’t? Do you find yourself saying ‘I should do that’ or ‘I shouldn’t do that’ a lot?
This word ‘should’ seems to feature very strongly for some of us.